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Sinop Turkey Cruise Port

Location:

Sinop Port, right in the mid-point of Black sea region, Turkey's most closest port to Russian Federation countries because of its location midpoint of the peninsula on the farthest northern point of Turkey.

It lies on an isthmus linking the Boztepe Peninsula to the mainland and is shut off from the Anatolian Plateau to the south by high, forest-clad mountains.

The port is close to area attractions, and it's easy to walk to most everything.

Printable map to take along.

Cruise calendar for this port.

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Live Nautical Chart with Wikipedia Markers

Monthly Climate Averages for Sinop Turkey

 

Sightseeing:

Sinop is a pleasant and ancient city on the Black Sea coast, North-East of Ankara. The center is to a large extent surrounded by a wall (often fallen into ruins or taken down) that at some gate dates back some 2500 years. It has not very many monuments, but a good mosque and medrese and some bath houses.

According to legend, Sinop was founded by the Amazons, who named it after their queen, Sinova. The city's ancient inhabitants ascribed its foundation to Autolycus, a companion of Hercules. Destroyed by the wandering Cimmerians, it was refounded toward the end of the 7th century BC by a colony of Milesians. It ultimately became the most flourishing Greek settlement on the Euxine (Black) Sea.

As a terminus of the trade routes from Upper Mesopotamia, it commanded much of the maritime trade of the Pontic region and by the 5th century BC had established many colonies on the coast and enjoyed naval supremacy in the Black Sea. In 183 BC it was taken by Pharnaces I and became the capital of the Pontic kings. Under Mithridates VI the Great, who was born there (as was the 4th-century-BC founder of the Cynic sect, Diogenes), it enjoyed a high degree of prosperity and was embellished with fine buildings, naval arsenals, and well-built harbors. The Roman Lucius Licinius Lucullus captured the seaport in 70 BC, and the city was nearly destroyed by fire.

Sinop's extant monuments include a ruined ancient citadel rebuilt during Byzantine and Seljuq periods, some isolated columns and inscribed stones built into the old walls and dating from the early Greek and Roman periods, and the Alâeddin Cami (a mosque), built in 1214. A 13th-century Alâiye religious school now houses the local museum. Sinop is linked by road with Samsun and by sea with Istanbul.

Tours Excursions Transportation:

In town, a taxi is cheap, and the fares are regulated. They are easy to find. For long journeys, however, drivers can charge more than the meter reads. So negotiate the fare in advance. The most unusual transportation in Turkey is called Dolmus for routes that buses don't take. The word actually means "To Fill"; thus, the dolumus leaves when it is full! They are usually a minibus, a jeep, or a van so they fill quickly. A bonus is that they will drop you off along the route.

Nearby Places:

Shopping and Food:

Traditional nautical wood carvings, good crystal and the original cotton clothes of the city are praiseworthy and unique

Traditional handicrafts such as carpets, copper goods, painted ceramics and jewelry are popular buys, along with a good selection of leather goods, sandals and beachwear which can be found in most of the larger resorts.

In souvenir shops and stalls, it's always worth trying a spot of haggling. For food shopping, local mini markets provide basic essentials, whilst the supermarkets found near the larger resorts are similar to those we are used to at home. Most resorts have a weekly market selling local produce, crafts and textiles and are well worth a visit.

Turkish food is amongst the best in the world. With enough climatic zones to grow most ingredients locally, there is a vast array of produce to excite and entice the palate. Besides its famous kebab dishes, there are many other traditional Turkish foods to choose from. Meze (appetisers) for which Turkey is justly famous, are a range of hundreds of small dishes from simple combinations such as cheese with melon to elaborately stuffed vegetables. These are served in all Turkish restaurants and are traditionally accompanied with Raki, a clear anise- flavoured spirit claimed to be Turkey's national alcoholic drink

Currency:

Turkey's currency is the Turkish Lira. Many shops and restaurants in the coastal resorts and big cities accept payment in foreign currency. But if you are planning to travel to other parts of the country, it is advisable to take some Turkish Lira.

With a credit or debit card you can withdraw local currency from cash machines which are found in convenient locations in cities, towns and resorts.

Currency Converter

Communication:

Internet-cafés or net-cafés are available even in small towns. All of them have have good DSL connections , and price for connection is about more or less 1 YTL/hour.

Free wireless connections are available at some hotels and restaurants/cafés, especially in big cities.

Emergency Ambulance: 112 (all over Turkey) Police: 155 (all over Turkey)

Opening Hours and Holidays:

In tourist and coastal areas, opening hours are quite flexible and during the summer many shops stay open until late in the evening, seven days a week, leaving tourists to browse at their leisure and escape the heat of the day.

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