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Puerto del Rosario Fuerteventura Spain Cruise Port

Location:

Puerto del Rosario is the capital of Fuerteventura. It is based around a port that has grown from its humble origins as the Puerto del Cabras (port of the goats) into a busy working port that continues to develop; the latest developments will allow more cruise ships to be accommodated.

The town center surrounds the port, so the main areas of interest are within easy walking distance.

webcam of the harbor

Printable map to take along.

Cruise calendar for this port.

Watch a destination video.

Live Nautical Chart with Wikipedia Markers

Monthly Climate Averages for Puerto del Rosario Fuerteventura Spain

 

Sightseeing:

Puerto del Rosario was known as Puerto Cabras up until 1956 when it was given it's rather more attractive new name. Originally the site of a Watering Hole used by local Farmer for their goats, the town started as little more than a few Goat Herder's Cottages and some Sailor's Huts.

In the early 19th Century a woman called Maria Estrada had opened a Tavern and the settlement had become a small village and port. The port was used for the export of Goats and their meat (hence the original name) as well as the export of products such as barilla. This growing importance as a port eventually led to Puerto Cabras becoming the capital of the island in 1860.

Ships usually offer a tour to Betancuria, or you may go to the beach, the Playa Blanca, about 3 km south of Puerto de Rosario.

If time permits Caleta de Fustes, about 10 km south, has a nice beach and marina.

Tours Excursions Transportation:

Puerto del Rosario is easily visited from other parts of the island as buses run to Puerto del Rosario from all the major towns on Fuerteventura. A bus journey to Puerto del Rosario to Caleta de Fuste takes around 20 minutes and to Corralejo about 40, with services to and from both every half an hour. A new bus station was opened in 2008, where you can get transport all around the island. If you are considering a shopping trip it is worth bearing in mind that lots of the shops close for the siesta.

Map of the island.

Nearby Places:

Fuerteventura's former capital Betancuria lies in a picturesque valley n Founded in 1405 by the Norman conqueror Jean de Bethencourt (hence the name Betancuria) has a fair amount of history behind it.

The reason for its location was to protect the capital from pirate attacks, although in 1593 the pirate Jaban penetrated the Betancuria and reduced everything including the Santa Maria church to a pile of rubble and ash.

Shopping and Food:

Until recently, Fuerteventura was not exactly a shoppers paradise, however with the opening of the Las Rotondas shopping center in Puerto del Rosario, things have changed. Apart from this shopping center, Corralejo and Puerto del Rosario are the best places to shop – just remember to carry your passport if you want to use your Credit Card!

Currency:

The euro

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Communication:

Spanish

Emergency number: Dial 112 free of charge (valid throughout Spain). Service is given in Spanish, and also in English, French and German in some tourist areas.

webcam at a beach.

Opening Hours and Holidays:

The most common business for shops and businesses hours are Monday through Saturday, from 9.30 h to 13.30 h, and from 16.30 to 20.00 h.

Big shopping centers and department stores open from 10.00 h to 21.00 or 22.00 h uninterruptedly. These big stores open sometimes on Sunday.

In coastal cities, in high season, shops are usually open passed 22.00 h.

Pharmacies open from 9.30 to 13.30 h, and from 16.30 to 20.00 h. In all major cities you can find pharmacies that open 24 hours. Pharmacies follow a rolling late-hour schedule, which is published in the newspapers, and is posted at all pharmacies.

Museums are in general closed on Mondays.

National public holidays.

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