whatsinport WHATSINPORT.COM: YOUR CRUISE GUIDE TO 1200 PORTS OF CALL

Interactive World Cruise Map
Home | Cruise Ships | Port Expenses | Hints and Tips

Quebec Canada Cruise Port

Location:

Disembarking right at the heart of Quebec City's historical district, cruise ships enable their passengers and crew members to enjoy the charms of the major tourist sites of Old Quebec City, including Place Royale, the Musée de la Civilisation, the Château Frontenac and the Petit Champlain district. And this is not to forget the countless sidewalk cafes, antique shops, art galleries and sidewalk artists who bring life to the City's picturesque streets.

The Old City of Quebec is situated on two levels, Lower Town, at the Port, and the Upper Town and quick walk from the cruise terminal.

The Funicular to the upper town, is next to the Place Royale across from the dock.

Distance from the airport about 16 km. Use a taxi.

The cruise terminal

Hotels near the Cruise Terminal

Printable map to take along.

Cruise calendar for this port and which dock will be used. Note: Dock 102, 103, and 104 are further away and shuttles will be used. Dock 22 is the main dock as described above.

Watch a destination video.

Live Nautical Chart with Wikipedia Markers

 

 

Sightseeing:

Château Frontenac The hotel is generally recognized as the most photographed hotel in the world, largely due to its prominence in the skyline of Quebec City. Although several of Quebec City's buildings are taller, the landmark hotel is perched atop a tall cape overlooking the Saint Lawrence River, affording a spectacular view for several kilometers.

An integral part of the Place-Royale historic site, the Maison Chevalier, restored in 1959, is in fact three separate houses: the Chesnay house, the Frérot house and the Chevalier house. Their fire walls, high fireplaces and arched cellars make them especially significant examples of Quebec's architectural heritage. The Maison Chevalier displays domestic scenes from the past in a permanent exhibition.

Basilique Notre-Dame-de-Québec in the Upper Town: This basilica has the oldest parish in North America, dating from 1647. Its somber, ornate interior includes a canopy dais over the episcopal throne, a ceiling of painted clouds decorated with gold leaf, richly colored stained-glass windows, and a chancel lamp that was a gift from Louis XIV.

The large and famous crypt was Québec City's first cemetery; more than 900 bodies are interred here, including 20 bishops and four governors of New France. Samuel de Champlain may be buried near the basilica: archaeologists have been searching for his tomb since 1950. There are information panels that allow you to read about the history of this church. Or, if you prefer, there are guided tours available.

Tours Excursions Transportation:

Quebec is made for waking.

There is a funicular from Rue du Petit Champlain in Lower Town to Hotel Chateau Frontenac in Upper Town.

Third party shore excursions and hop on/off tours.

Nearby Places:

Less than thirty minutes from downtown, it is possible to enjoy the landscapes of Ile d'Orléans, the Beaupré Coast and the magnificent Montmorency Falls. A famed pilgrimage destination, the Basilica of Ste-Anne de Beaupré attracts large numbers of visitors every year.  All this and even more make Quebec City a unique destination in North America.

Shopping and Food:

Quebec City's Old Town, especially Basse-Ville, is riddled with shops for tourists. Watch for leather goods and various handmade crafts made by Canada's First Nations Peoples.

All restaurants in the Old City will post menus out front in French and in English. Look for the table d'hote specials for a full course fixed price meal. On the cheaper (but very satisfying) side, have a traditional tourtière quebecois (meat pie), or a poutine (fries, gravy, and cheese curds).

It's considered normal to tip 10-15% of a restaurant bill. Tips are also usually given to bell hops, concierges, room cleaners, cab drivers, hairdressers, hotel attendants and, by savvy drinkers, bar staff.

Currency:

Canadian dollar

You will find ATMs in many grocery stores, malls, airports and so on, and most are linked to the international networks, the most common being Cirrus, Plus, Star and Maestro. You can also grab cash from an ATM if you use a major credit card although this method tends to be more expensive because, in addition to a service fee, you'll be charged interest immediately.

Currency Converter

Communication:

There is free WiFi at the cruise terminal.

French spoken, English understood.

Opening Hours and Holidays:

>

Holidays in Canada

Help us to keep this page up to date: Mail us your suggestions

Thank you for printing this article! Please don’t forget to come back to whatsinport.com for new and updated port guides.